Making a panorama

I am on the board for our local Baptist assisted living and nursing home, Riverview Estates. As such, I try to be involved in the life of the community there 1. This week my involvement down at the home helped me practice some Lightroom skills.

Riverview has a mural painted in it’s Administrative hallway which has been around from time immemorial. It was slated to be covered with paint as part of renovations, but resident objections have changed plans 2. Now the goal is to preserve it, so I offered one option. I could capture the mural in a number of photos and stitch them together as a panorama. This panorama could be printed on canvas and re-hung in place, should the mural not be salvageable in its current form.

So I headed down to the home with a tripod and my new 18-105mm lens 3 to capture the mural in all it’s glory. I tried two different methods. I first kept the tripod in place and pivoted the head. I didn’t like the results from that set so I took a second series where I slid the tripod along the hallway. This kept the angle of the camera consistent throughout.

My lightroom series
The series of Photos in Lightroom.

The result looked pretty good.

Mural with shadow due to lighting
The shadowed area is caused by the light fixtures in the hallway.

I wasn’t able to set up lights for my shoot 4, so I was at the mercy of the light fixtures in the hallway. This left a deep shadow about a third of the way into the image. This was not acceptable, and there was only so much I could do adjusting the highlights and shadows of the entire image. The differences were too great.

Elipse mask being applied to the panorama
An elipse mask being applied to the panorama. The shaded area is what will be affected by any adjustments which are made.

To rectify this problem I applied an elliptical mask which covered the area in shadow. I then reduced the exposure of the unmasked portions of the photos, which resulted in a much smoother result. If I was a bit more skilled with Lightroom I’m sure I could produce even better results, but I was pleased with what I was able to achieve.

Riverview Mural, color is off on the right
While the shadows are now more even, the odd color cast at the right needed to be dealt with.

The tint was a bit off on the right side of the panorama, so I applied a gradient filter and altered the color temperature of that portion of the image.

A gradient mask is being applied to change the color temperature and even it out.
A gradient mask is being applied to change the color temperature and even it out.

This left me with the final result. I am pleased!

Final Riverview Mural - with evened out shadows and a more consistent color cast
Final Riverview Mural – with evened out shadows and a more consistent color cast.

  1. And not nearly enough, to be honest. 
  2. And good for our residents, I may add. 
  3. The old one is not well, it may never be well again. 
  4. Seeing as I own none. 

One Comment

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  1. The last exposure is my favorite .Youu are so good at photography. I love your work. Sent from my iPad

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